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Can a dog retear acl after surgery

Can a dog retear acl after surgery


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Can a dog retear acl after surgery?

How long after ACL reconstruction surgery (in human patients) is it safe to begin trning and working with the dog? Does a dog "retear" his ACL? I think about how a human will sometimes experience a second tear from not strengthening the ligament properly during recovery. I know in humans it is sometimes reattached as a procedure during rehab.

Re: Can a dog retear acl after surgery?

Originally Posted by doglover77

How long after ACL reconstruction surgery (in human patients) is it safe to begin trning and working with the dog? Does a dog "retear" his ACL? I think about how a human will sometimes experience a second tear from not strengthening the ligament properly during recovery. I know in humans it is sometimes reattached as a procedure during rehab.

ACLs in humans are usually reattached as they heal, so while the ACL may heal in a slightly different pattern than the normal ACL, this is not a "retear" type injury.

Re: Can a dog retear acl after surgery?

Originally Posted by doglover77

How long after ACL reconstruction surgery (in human patients) is it safe to begin trning and working with the dog? Does a dog "retear" his ACL? I think about how a human will sometimes experience a second tear from not strengthening the ligament properly during recovery. I know in humans it is sometimes reattached as a procedure during rehab.

ACLs in humans are usually reattached as they heal, so while the ACL may heal in a slightly different pattern than the normal ACL, this is not a "retear" type injury.

I don't think that the retear would have anything to do with the way in which a dog heals... it's more that the tear could happen, and the healing could be much slower, if ever. I've read about people who have undergone knee surgery on their dogs, and were told that it wasn't advisable to keep them off of full weight bearing and other strenuous activities for an extended period of time, but have had good luck so far after an ACL replacement.

Re: Can a dog retear acl after surgery?

Originally Posted by doglover77

How long after ACL reconstruction surgery (in human patients) is it safe to begin trning and working with the dog? Does a dog "retear" his ACL? I think about how a human will sometimes experience a second tear from not strengthening the ligament properly during recovery. I know in humans it is sometimes reattached as a procedure during rehab.

ACLs in humans are usually reattached as they heal, so while the ACL may heal in a slightly different pattern than the normal ACL, this is not a "retear" type injury.

Re: Can a dog retear acl after surgery?

Does anyone have experience with ACL repr surgery? I have 2 Labradors (Maggie and Ollie), they had a ruptured ACL on the left side last year. They underwent ACL surgery with Dr. Mark Pfeifer of The Orthopedic Center in New Orleans, La. on July 26, 2010. I used to be the Assistant Director for Animal Advocacy for the American Veterinary Medical Association. I know Dr. Pfeifer well as he is the owner and founder of the New Orleans Orthopedic Center. He is the only orthopedic surgeon in the New Orleans area to be on the "Super Orthopedic Advisory Board" for the AVMA Animal Welfare Committee.

Re: Can a dog retear acl after surgery?

Originally Posted by doglover77

Does anyone have experience with ACL repr surgery? I have 2 Labradors (Maggie and Ollie), they had a ruptured ACL on the left side last year. They underwent ACL surgery with Dr. Mark Pfeifer of The Orthopedic Center in New Orleans, La. on July 26, 2010. I used to be the Assistant Director for Animal Advocacy for the American Veterinary Medical Association. I know Dr. Pfeifer well as he is the owner and founder of the New Orleans Orthopedic Center. He is the only orthopedic surgeon in the New Orleans area to be on the "Super Orthopedic Advisory Board" for the AVMA Animal Welfare Committee.

I don't have any direct experience with ACL surgery, but I've been a veterinary student for quite a few years now and I have heard more than my share of stories about dogs being successfully operated on for ACL repr.

It's one of the more complicated procedures performed by any veterinarian. It requires a rather thorough understanding of the anatomy of the dog's knee joint, the ligaments, the muscles that run through the joint, the cruciate and collateral ligaments, and their roles in the mechanics of the knee joint.

When it's time to perform the procedure, the surgeon will cut up the joint and remove any debris to make the actual repr to the ACL as easy as possible. The most common method of repr that is performed is the Dr. Steven's modified O'Connor repr. It consists of a piece of extra-long cruciate ligament that is folded in half and sutured through both the lateral and medial menisci. This procedure allows the dog's knee to be reduced, which is the most difficult step.

A few other procedures have been developed to reduce the likelihood of joint stiffness after the surgery, but the one used by the practitioner I worked for was the one described above. That way, you really don't need to worry about stiffness. You may ask the practitioner what method he used. It's the procedure that Dr. Pfeifer used and that I was so happy about. The modified Dr. O'Connor repr is the method that he uses.

If you've taken your dog to another practice, the owner will know what to expect. He'll tell you how the procedure went, what happened, and what the final result was. If the procedure was successful, you'll find out that the animal feels much better after the surgery and it can move around normally as if nothing had happened. It won't take a long time for the dog to get back to his full activity. If the procedure fled or caused pn or stiffness in the knee, you'll find out right away. If there was infection or another complication, the veterinarian will tell you how to handle it. He will advise you that you must follow the instructions of the veterinary staff. If there is any swelling, take the animal to the veterinary hospital immediately for treatment.

If your pet had a prior injury, be sure to let your veterinarian know about it. This could affect the surgery and may require a change in the method the veterinary clinic is using.

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