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Cats eyes rolling back

Cats eyes rolling back



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Cats eyes rolling back in head is a medical emergency

What You Need to Know about the Symptoms

By now you might have read a fair bit of content about the symptoms, causes, and potential complications of cat eye syndrome. We hope you've been able to avoid them altogether with the information we've shared on this page. But if you're the unfortunate owner of a cat with cat eyes, be prepared to read plenty of information that might seem confusing or contradictory at times. There is some confusion regarding the symptoms of cat eye syndrome, but we'll do our best to clear things up in this article.

The first thing to remember is that cats have two pairs of eyes. The outermost pair are our primary eyes, which we use to see, and the second pair are actually "feline" eyes which are used for vision in dimly-lit or dark environments. When these eyes, commonly called "cat's eyes", roll into the back of the head (called "retinal detachment"), the cat's vision is impaired. This condition is known as "cat's eyes syndrome" or "retinal detachment."

Why Do Cats' Eyes Roll Back?

If you've owned a cat in the past few years, you've probably been to the veterinarian multiple times to get your cat's ears cleaned and/or have him or her vaccinated. We hope you're well aware of the importance of doing this, but you might not realize what happens to the eyes if cat's ears are cleaned. If this occurs, the pet owner is likely to be alarmed when they notice that the cat's eyes roll back. The most common cause for this is an accumulation of earwax on the inner ear area, which if allowed to dry out and block the ear canal can be very painful.

Cat's eyes syndrome occurs because the back of the eye, where the retina is located, is pulled forward and gets stuck into the socket of the eye. There are a number of causes for this condition, including injury to the eye, surgery or illness, such as cat scratch disease. If the cat's ears are cleaned, this is likely to happen because of the earwax, which can get stuck between the pet's eye and the ear.

While this condition can occur at any age, the most common age for it to happen is between two and three years old, when the pet is beginning to develop the instinct to scratch his or her ears. If your cat has this condition and is scratching his or her ears, it's a good idea to take your pet to the veterinarian to get this looked at right away. There are no cures for this condition, and once it happens, the vision may be permanently impaired.

To help prevent your cat from scratching his or her ears, remember to keep a close eye on your pet. While this can be difficult, it is possible to prevent cats from itching their ears in the first place. You can also train your cat to use a scratching post instead of you.

About the Author

Rachel P. Davis is a freelance writer and editor who has worked in the field of veterinary medicine for years. She received her bachelors of science in biology from the University of South Carolina and her doctorate in animal and poultry science from Auburn University.

Photo Credits

iStock.com/hokosun

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Watch the video: BBC Schools Cats Eyes Magnets (August 2022).

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